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Honoring Our Veterans

WOODLAWN HONORS OUR VETERANS

The memorials on the grounds of The Woodlawn Cemetery recognize those who have fought to protect our nation from the War of 1812 through the conflicts America faces today. Each year for Memorial Day, the volunteers of the Woodlawn Conservancy place flags at the gravesites of the Veterans in Woodlawn’s care. More than 6,500 flags are placed by 300 members of our community.

CIVIL WAR LEADERS

ADMIRAL DAVID GLASGOW FARRAGUT (1801-1870)

The first Admiral of the United States Navy was the hero of the Battle of Mobile Bay. “Damn the Torpedoes, Full Speed Ahead,” was what Farragut cried out as he led his sailors to victory. The Admiral Farragut Gravesite was designated a National Historic Landmark in 2012.

GENERAL RICHARD BUSTEED (1822-1898)

Although he received the rank of General, Busteed was best known for serving as the US District Judge of Alabama during reconstruction.

GENERAL ZACHARIAH DEAS (1819-1882)

A native of South Carolina, Deas served in the Confederate Army leading troops at the Battles of Manassas, Shiloh and Chickamauga. Following the war, he resumed his career as a cotton broker and lived in New York.

GENERAL ARCHIBALD GRACIE (1832-1864)

The West Point graduate and member of a well known New York family served as a Brigadier General in the Confederate Army. Mortally wounded during the siege of Petersburg, Gracie’s remains were brought back to New York and laid to rest in the family plot.

GENERAL MANSFIELD LOVELL (1822-1884)

Lovell left his position as Deputy Street Commissioner in New York City to serve in the Confederate Army. The Major General was highly criticized for failing to secure the city of New Orleans from Farragut’s naval attack.

GENERAL ROBERT B. POTTER (1829-1887)

Potter led troops at Bull Run, Antietam and Vicksburg and was wounded twice during the war. He worked in railroads and spent his final years in Newport, RI.

GENERAL FRANZ SIGEL (1824-1902)

Born in Baden, Germany Sigel was an important leader during the Civil War as he was able to motivate and lead the growing legions of immigrant troops. Siegel was a teacher before the war and worked as a newspaper.

GENERAL FREDERICK A. STARRING (1834-1904)

An engineer and lawyer, Starring fought in the battle of Vicksburg. After the war he served as a diplomat and worked in the Treasury Department.

GENERAL LLOYD TILGHMAN (1816-1863)

A resident of Kentucky, like many graduates of the United State Military Academy Tilghman was an engineer. Killed at the Battle of Champion Hill in the Vicksburg Campaign, Tilghman’s remains were brought to Woodlawn in 1901.

CONGRESSIONAL MEDAL OF HONOR RECIPIENTS

JOHN HENRY COOK (1840-1916)

The London native was honored for valor at the Battle of Pleasant Hill in 1864.

NICHOLAS ERICKSON (1870-1931)

Born in Finland, he was honored for his bravery aboard the U.S.S. Marblehead during the Spanish-American War.

JOHN BARCLAY FASSETT (1843-1905)

He served in the Infantry of his home state of Pennsylvania and was honored for his service at the Battle of Gettysburg.

THEODORE GREIG (1843-1893)

The native New Yorker was honored for his brave acts at the Battle of Antietam in 1862.

EDWARD KNOX (1842-1916)

He served with the 15th New York Light Artillery and was honored for his bravery at the Battle of Gettysburg.

JULIUS LANGBEIN (1846-1910)

At the age of sixteen, the drummer boy from Germany rescued a fellow soldier and was honored for his service in 1862.

JAMES POND (1838-1903)

For his bravery against the Quantrill’s Raiders at the outbreak of the Civil War he received the nation’s highest honor.

JOHN JAMES POWERS (1912-1942)

The graduate of the US Naval Academy was honored for his bravery during the Battle of the Coral Sea in WWII.

JOHN DARLING TERRY (1845-1919)

After losing his leg at the Battle of New Bern in 1862, Terry continued to fight and encouraged his troops. He received the Medal of Honor in 1867.

HENRY TREMAIN (1840-1910)

The aide to General Sickles was honored for riding through enemy lines while fighting in Georgia in 1864.

CHARLES WORAM (1845-1897)

Serving in the United States Navy, he was honored for his courage during the Battle of Mobile Bay in 1864.

CELEBRATED SOLDIERS

LUCY BAINBRIDGE (NURSE)

Born in Ohio, Lucy Elizabeth Seaman joined the Ohio Soldiers’ Aid Society and was sent to Fredericksburg, Virginia, where she cared for the wounded soldiers as they were being transported by boat to Washington, DC. She was later asked to go to the front of the Union Armies, and she subsequently served at Port Royal, White House Landing and City Point, all in Virginia. “Sister Ohio,” a name she earned on the battlefield sidelines, died at Gramercy Park in New York City.

ADELAIDE BROOKS BAYLIS (1883-1965)

The first commissioned woman captain in the New York Home Defense Service, Baylis served in WWI as commander of the Red Cross Ambulance Service and as National Director of the American Women’s Voluntary Services during WWII.

ALLEN BELL, JR. (1861-1923)

A Second Lieutenant from Company D, 107th Infantry Regiment, Bell is considered missing in action after his death at the Battle of Soissons in France during WWI. His family placed a cenotaph at Woodlawn which reads, “In loving memory, beloved son and brother who made the supreme sacrifice in the World War, Sept. 1, 1918. He rests in an unknown grave somewhere in France.”

HERMAN ST. JOHN BOLDT (1893-1918)

A native of Manhattan, Lieutenant Herman St. John Boldt was a member of the 102nd Infantry of the New England Division in WWI. He was a volunteer aerial observer in American Escadrille No. 1 when he was shot by a sniper on July 20, 1918. He was, posthumously, awarded France’s Croix de Guerre.

IVAN BYNOE (1917-2004)

One of the legendary Tuskegee Airmen, Bynoe served our nation as a flyer during World War II. He was an officer with the 477th Bomber Group.

HUGH GORDON CAMPBELL

A member of the American Flying Club, the Lafayette Escadrille and the Foreign Legion, this World War I flyer was twice wounded. He received the Croix de Guerre with four palms for valour. Campbell was tragically killed after the war in an air show incident.

VERNON CASTLE (1887-1918)

Internationally acclaimed dancer who lost his life in a training accident during the first World War.

STEPHEN WHITNEY DICKEY

Second Lieutenant Stephen Whitney Dickey was the son of a wealthy Manhattan banker and graduated from St. Paul’s Preparatory School. He enlisted in the Army and was a member of the 110th Infantry Regiment, Twenty-Eighth Division, during WWI. He was well loved and respected by his men. He was shot and killed on September 27, 1918. Buried in Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery, his family erected at cenotaph at Woodlawn after the war.

NATALE GRECO

Sergeant Greco was one of several young men from the Bronx who volunteered to serve in WWII. Greco lost his life when the B-24 Liberator plane he was assigned to was shot down in Germany. The family commissioned a portrait bust of the young man in uniform and it stands next to another member of the crew from the Williamsbridge neighborhood.

EDWARD G. HEUSSER (1895-1918)

PFC Edward Heusser was a German-American, drafted to serve in WWI. He was killed in the Battle of the Meuse-Argonne on October 12, 1918 and his family requested his remains be returned to the United States for burial at Woodlawn.

DR. THEODORE CALDWELL JANEWAY (1872-1917)

Chief of the Division of Internal Medicine in the Surgeon General’s Office, Dr. Janeway earned a Distinguished Service Medal for his work during WWI. He worked at the Army hospital in Baltimore. He died during the influenza pandemic of 1917.

ROBERT JARVIE (1898-1918)

PFC Jarvie was born in Scotland and immigrated to New York with his family. He enlisted in the New York National Guard at age 19 and served in the 107th Infantry, Twenty-Seventh Division, Fox Company. He was mortally wounded on October 18, 1918, during fierce combat while pursuing the retreating German army in the Somme Offensive. Originally buried in a British cemetery, his father requested his remains be brought to Woodlawn for final burial.

NELSON TOWNLEY KENYON  (1893-1918)

Cpt. Nelson Townley Kenyon was a lieutenant assigned to Company A, 307th Infantry, Seventh-Seventh Division during WWI. He was wounded at the Battle of the Meuse-Argonne on November 6, 1918 and died three days later. He was posthumously promoted to captain and awarded the Silver Star Medal.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN COLON-PEREZ

New Yorker Sgt. Abraham Lincoln Colon-Perez, was killed in action in Binh Duong province South Vietnam on March 3, 1968 through hostile action at the age of twenty-two. His awards included National Defense Service Medal, Combat Infantryman Badge, and the Purple Heart.

QUENTIN ROBERTSON LOGIE (1895-1918)

Second Lieutenant Logie commanded Company K, Ninth Infantry, Second Division during WWI. In the summer of 1918, his platoon was caught in some of the most intense combat of any American unit at Belleau Wood. He was killed June 9, 1918.

CLEMENCE N. PAGE (1895-1918)

Corporal Page was a member of Company G, 107th Infantry Regiment during WWI. He fought at the Fourth Battle of Flanders in Belgium, the Hindenburg Line, vendhuille, and the La Selle River. He received posthumous commemoration for making personal sacrifice for the advancement of his company.

JOSEPH PULITZER (1847-1911)

The newspaper publisher came to America in 1864 to serve in the Union Army at the end of the American Civil War.

CLARK TERRY (1920-2015)

Acclaimed jazz trumpeter played with Count Basie and Duke Ellington and served in the US Navy during WWII.

JOE WILDER (1922-2014)

Wilder was one of the first 1000 African Americans to serve in the US Marine Corps. He was the recipient of the NEH Jazz Masters Award.